Robby Taylor

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  • in reply to: Feedback on my workout/Back to basics #30218
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    thanks again for your suggestions man! are you on facebook? you can find me through Al’s page

    in reply to: progressing #30210
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    well of those 5 the one arm push up and pistol squat are by far the easiest. Al’s tutorials for these will get you there. For the pistols, you may benefit from doing additional skill training outside of actual workouts because of the mobility demands of the exercise.

    the one arm handstand is really a long term hand balancing goal and you should focus on getting a very solid two arm handstand at this point instead. the front lever and one arm pull up both will require a lot of lat strength and a lot of shoulder pulling strength. however, i would suggest focusing on getting really solid at the muscle up first. weighted pull ups can be helpful for all 3 of those exercises, in addition to more specific progressions.

    as far as progressing directly, i tend to keep my rep ranges and sets fairly similar i just mix it up by structuring my workouts differently with various exercises. i usually pick one or two hard upper body exercises and a lower body exercise, and sometimes also one or two easier upper body exercises. it’s all about balancing the workload throughout your body. if i’m doing pull ups as my only pulling exercise, i will do sets of 15 or 20 with various grips. but if i’m doing muscle ups and pull ups i will probably only do sets of 10 maybe 12. but, yes you can also try to add reps whenever you feel able. and there’s no reason you can’t add weight to these movements; weighted pull ups, dips, and pistols offer a great avenue to progress.

    in reply to: Hindu Squats #30221
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I’ve read that this exercise is bad for the knees, and I’ve also read that it can help strengthen the knees. I suppose it depends on the quality of form and also the individual. This one’s a bit different than other squats because of the momentum involved and raising of the heel. Regardless, I personally feel it’s better to make use of the shrimp squat and pistol squat instead if your primary goal here is strength development. Even at its difficulty level I don’t think the Hindu squat is worth any potential risk because there are comparable variations (tuck jumps, box jumps, Bulgarian split squats, etc) that are probably safer. Of course some people won’t have any issues with it and can do it indefinitely.

    in reply to: Problem with grip/forearm endurance on the bar #30232
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Hey Liam,

    In this case, I suggest that you focus your pull up training on commando pull ups. That way you will be able to get a good number of reps. But, do 4 sets, 2 on each side. I also suggest you train hanging leg raises just as regularly. This will primarily be to train the grip strength but it will also of course be helpful in developing core strength. Don’t worry about touching your feet to the bar at this time; just keep your legs straight and bring them up to an L position. Also, the hook grip is simply a suggestion, everyone is different. If you find a normal grip much easier then it would be wise to use that grip in order to build your reps up. Over time, simply spending time on the bar will build your grip strength up, but if you feel you need more there are things you can do off of the bar.

    The simplest thing to do is to wring a towel. Just get a towel and wring it out. You may want t to get it wet first so you can get some kind of feedback on how hard you’re wringing it. If you want to develop serious grip strength, you may want to consider getting a high capacity gripper. I personally recommend the Gillingham High Performance grippers. There are 10 levels of these grippers, and I have a 3, 5, and 7. I find the 5 to be a serious challenge and the 7 is just ridiculous (there’s a validation program for anyone who can close a 7 or higher; they estimate that only a few hundred people in the world can currently close a 7 legitimately). For you I would recommend a 3 at the highest.

     

    Also, I assume you’re working on hand balancing to some capacity, but if not you should. This builds hand and forearm strength in a different way, and you should be doing both to ensure a balanced development. I can’t say how much this will help your grip strength on the bar, but it is important in the bigger picture. At this stage you should focus on primarily developing proper handstands, but I also suggest spending time on L sits, frog stands, and elbow levers.

    in reply to: Combining raising the bar,pushing the limits #30236
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Sure man, handstands can be done every day. The program I laid out is merely a template; feel free to modify it to your specifications.

    in reply to: handstand push ups #30239
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Well if it’s causing you undue distress then you should probably stop doing it until you can figure why. If you’re not experiencing such symptoms and you’re simply concerned about the risks, keep in mind what I said in my previous post yet if you’re still uncomfortable doing handstand push ups I would suggest subbing it with one arm push ups for strength and one arm elbow levers for balance.

    in reply to: Combining raising the bar,pushing the limits #30237
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Sure no problem at all doing that. I personally like doing full body workouts so I do a leg exercise and an upper body pushing movement and upper body pulling movement. This is a little from both books in every workout. At your level I’d also recommend a core specific exercise. But just play around with programming and see what works best for you. I’d recommend a heavy pulling day and a heavy pushing day, something like this:

    Day 1: pull ups, push ups, hanging L leg raise, lunges/split squats/etc.

    Day 2: dips, Australian pull ups, plank/back bridge progression, tuck jump squats

    Consider doing back bridges as part of a warm up or cool down because they’re exceptionally beneficial so it is a great habit to do them often in some form.

    in reply to: handstand push ups #30241
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    There’re risks with any exercise. But, the truth is your body adapts, and many people never have problems like that with handstands. That information is just precautionary to people who have blood pressure issues, are prone to light headedness, or have similar issues. Since you’ve been doing them awhile you would definitely have felt such an issue.

    in reply to: Err… how does an exercise-everyday routine look like? #30244
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I don’t see how working out every day would be easier than 3/7 days. It should be harder! Have you considered doing every other day?

    A routine can consist of whatever you want. It sounds like you want to do several easier workouts rather than fewer difficult ones. What exactly are you doing now, sets, reps, etc? You might want to try alternating between a pulling focused day and then a pushing focused day, perhaps something like this:

     

    Day 1: pull ups, push ups, squats (ideally pistol or shrimp squats, or whatever is difficult enough; perhaps lunges, Bulgarian split squats, or cossack squats if shrimps and pistols are too hard), planks (or straight leg raises [on parallel bars or hanging off of pull up bar])

    Day 2: dips, Australian pull ups, squats, planks/leg raises

    You’ll notice day 1 has a harder pulling exercise and easier pushing exercise while day 2 is the opposite. At this stage it is a great idea to do a separate exercise as none of these exercises alone are exceptionally difficult in that regard; it is ideal to work your way up to L sits, and by the time you can do full hanging leg raises and start seeing serious progress with the back lever, muscle up, etc, then you won’t have to worry about abdominal work so explicitly.

     

    EDIT: actually you should do bridges sometime as well. Maybe leg raises or planks one day then bridges the other day.

    in reply to: Aerobic Conditioning #30247
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Yeah, there will be some carry over, most notably to lung capacity I believe. Also if you get good at sprints I imagine running distance will be less likely to make you cramp up.

    The bottom line though is that aerobic training, by its nature, requires time to train. If you try to do it in less time, you must increase the intensity proportionately for a similar workload. And eventually you cross over into anaerobic training. If time is an issue then I’d suggest something that you can literally do on the spot, so as to minimize excess time (stretching, changing clothes, etc). If its boredom find something fun. You may want to try parkour, if there’s a suitable place to do it.

    in reply to: Aerobic Conditioning #30248
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    By circles do you mean this?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we-tnjodvGc

    those are really hard…yeah that’s anaerobic for sure haha.

    I think most of the exercises I listed in my last post can be done as an aerobic exercise, but unless you’re trying to be super hardcore I think low jumping jacks and squat jumps would be too taxing. Although it would be pretty damn impressive to see someone jump rope for 30 minutes (with both legs together jumping at the same time).

    I dunno, try jumping jacks for 15 minutes and let us know how it goes! Not sure how that would be for your knees, which is why I recommended swimming. Try swimming for 30 minutes straight, that would definitely be a great aerobic workout and would save your knees. Also it’s obviously a great way to stay cool in the summer months.

    You could also try get ups (just lie on the floor and stand up, then repeat) or burpees (you don’t necessarily have to do a jump or a push up during the burpee; this would allow you to do it for a longer time with less intensity).

    Sorry if this isn’t really what you’re looking for, aerobic training really isn’t my thing. Al will probably have better advice since he’s done a marathon and a triathlon.

     

    I can tell you this though: one of my friends at work had a promising boxing career in his youth, and he tells me his favorite exercise for general conditioning in boxing is distance running.

    in reply to: mastering skills #30252
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Looks good man! Here’s what I did the last 3 days

     

    Day 1: dragon flags, back levers, pistols with a 30 pound dumbbell

    Day 2: adv. Frog stands, tuck front levers, back bridge, handstand facing wall, hold bottom position of pistol squat (when I add weight to them I hold on to my free foot to make the mobility requirement easier, but I aim to improve here by holding the bottom position unassisted).

    Day 3: muscle ups, HeSPU, pistols with 30 pound dumbbell.

    Today’s my day off. I’m really thinking about repeating this cycle at least a couple more times. A couple of months ago I was doing more exercises in a given workout but it would take like 2 or 3 hours. This feels pretty good right now and I feel like I’m still making progress; back levers and dragon flags are easier than they’ve ever been, and my bridging is also advancing quite well. I also feel like I’m making progress on the one arm chin.

    As you may notice the back lever is a critical exercise at this stage, particularly with a supinated grip (chin up grip, palms facing feet during the lever). Excelling at this exercise will help you prepare for the planche (it’s said the core requirements are nearly identical), the one arm chin (due to the stress put on the biceps and elbows), and will also have good carry over to the muscle up. It is also useful to set the groundwork for the front lever, and even critical in training for the iron cross and, obviously, the Maltese cross.

    in reply to: Aerobic Conditioning #30250
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Jump rope, jumping jacks, low jumping jacks, swimming, jump squats, running in place (high knees)…is that the kind of thing you’re looking for? I would also do a basic strength training workout if you’re going to be lifting bikes up and such for hours; at least pull ups dips and some kind of one leg squat. Core strength sounds important here to so L sits should fit the bill.

    in reply to: mastering skills #30253
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Anywhere man, I think if you’re going to do an extensive hand balancing session on a training day you should do it after your regular training that way you can be as fresh as possible for your main workout. But you can also just work on a skill for a minute or less whenever you find time; sometimes I will do handstands while getting gas. The great thing about it is even if you can only spare literally a minute it’s plenty of time to do these skills; a 1 minute L sit is extremely impressive to me. I can’t do handstands at work because its a “safety hazard”, but I found 1 arm elbow levers a great way to practice balancing and strength simultaneously. Just get creative with it man. Coach Wade, author of Convict Conditioning, recommends practicing flags whenever you’re around a pole on the street!

    in reply to: mastering skills #30255
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Looks solid man! Personally I often tweak my workouts and their scheduling, I just go with what looks good for now and mix it up every now and again. I currently try to do a main workout every odd day then an isometric/hand balancing workout every other even day. Every 4th day is a day off. But sometimes I take an extra day off haha.

Viewing 15 posts - 181 through 195 (of 212 total)