Robby Taylor

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  • in reply to: One arm dip proggressions request #29476
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    As you’ve seen, a one arm dip is doable. There are a few variations. If you try this on a pull up bar, when you go down you’ll find it very difficult to keep yourself from simply falling under the bar. Your legs will want to shoot forward to compensate for the disparity of doing a one arm dip. For this reason, I suggest doing this move with your legs against a wall or something like that. Even though this keeps you from “spinning out”, you should still let your legs move up and down with the rest of your body to ensure that you are pressing your whole weight.

    Getting really good with the one arm push up will help prepare you for the one arm dip. Frankly, I think most people would be better off getting really good with the one arm push up than struggling with the one arm dip. I mean, I’m sure if you take the time to develop good mechanics for the one arm dip and can begin to do several reps then it could be a really great exercise…the problem is that it’s rather esoteric. The mechanics are pretty crazy, especially on a straight bar, so it’s cumbersome just to try to do, let alone get good at. You have to be damn strong to do it at all, but you’ll notice most guys do this thing when they press up where they like lean their body over the bar and kind of push their weight up and forward and it looks like they’re kind of using their upper body to “hop” up/across the bar, like an assist. And that’s pretty much what’s happening because the positioning of the body makes it extremely difficult to do a clean press up from the bottom of the dip, even for really strong guys. But hey, I love seeing guys who can rep out one arm pull ups and one arm dips like most people do with two arms. Lastly, a one arm dip is still going to be a good deal easier than a one arm handstand push up. Still crazy though

    in reply to: Sports Conditioning #29484
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    For football you mainly should focus on core strength and leg strength, obviously. Get good at pistol squats and either L sits and/or hanging leg raises. It would also be wise to get good at bridging, I’d suggest working on the stand to stand bridge if you can. Upper body strength is not so important, but I’d still suggest at least ensuring that you are solid at pull ups and dips, and if you want to go further then muscle ups and handstand push ups would be awesome.

    I’d also suggest some regular sprinting, if you’re not already doing that. Otherwise, I’d suggest working on box jumps or some other kind of intense jumping exercise. The only other thing I’d suggest off of the top of my head is tire flipping or sled dragging (sled dragging would probably be more applicable for football). But go hard, it should be like a sprint not an endurance thing. Like don’t go so heavy that you can barely move it, you want to be able to move quickly, but make sure that it’s hard so at first you can’t go for too long.

    in reply to: planks #29478
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Once you can comfortably hold a plank for 2 minutes, I suggest start working on L sits. They are both isometrics but L sits will take you much farther and help prepare you more for levers. Also with planks you can work leg raises concurrently building toward full hanging leg raises. Once you can do those and L sits comfortably then you will probably be ready to start training on the more advanced levers.

    in reply to: Which one of Al's books to purchase?? #29481
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Pushing the Limits and Raising the Bar contain sample routines, but theyre really more about the exercises and progressions rather than specific programming.

    Those books are good though, just pick exercises that are in line with your goals and that you can do no more than 10 reps. 3-5 sets per exercise, 3 days per week or every other day to start. You could do all of your exercises on the same day or do a workout based on pushing the limits one day and raising the bar the other day.

    in reply to: Does handstand push up work the upper chest? #29489
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    It depends on your form. The more your back is arched the more your chest will be utilized. Overall though of course the handstand push up will mostly be working the upper back and triceps. Back levers, skin the cats and diamond grip lallane push ups probably do more for the upper chest though I would say.

    in reply to: Beginner Musscle up #29497
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    At the least, you will want to practice pull ups dips and hanging leg raises. I also suggest rollovers and muscle up negatives. Id say a reasonable timeframe to get a muscle up for someone who is reasonably fit starting out and pretty dedicated is 2-6 months. Could be longer, or even shorter. So don’t get too set on a deadline. I think I was training for about 5 months before I got a muscle up on rings.

    in reply to: Overtraining concern #29502
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Either way will be fine, try both. I don’t often do cardio, but when I do its sprint intervals, usually superset with pistol squats (sprint, walk back, sprint again, but do a set of pistols on each leg between each sprint. High intensity cardio like that you can consider a type of strength training, and you could even consider sprinting and cycling to be forms of calisthenics (punching bag is more arguable, though I would still consider it a type of strength training as well). This means that doing these exercises on the same day as advanced calisthenics could exhaust you for the other workout. Overall if you do them the same day I’d recommend doing whichever is your focus in your first workout. So if calisthenics is your primary goal do that early and sprint later in the day.

    in reply to: Pistols – bottom part #29505
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Single leg wall sit primarily helps with developing strength to press up through pistol and also building up knee integrity. For holding the bottom I suggest just holding the bottom for time. For getting through the sticking point going down…that’s mostly about keeping your center of gravity from going too far backward. Try to keep your butt as much over your heel as you can.

    in reply to: Pistols – bottom part #29506
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    So you’re looking for an isometric “push” for your legs to help develop strength for pistol squats? Try single leg wall sits held for time! Try to build up to 30 seconds per leg.

    in reply to: Abs 6 days out of 7? Opinions please #29516
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    An L hang is still a worthwhile exercise, as it is essentially an isometric version of the hanging leg raise. As for the hanging leg raises, you need to stabilize your hips from swinging. When you raise your legs up, try to keep your hips from moving forward. When you get to the L position, pause in this position if you need to in order to stop any excess movement. Once you are still, lower your legs back down with control. With practice, you will be able to do these steady straight leg L raises with more precision. Once you can comfortably do that, you can start working on the full hanging leg raise. From the hanging L, tuck your knees to your chest, bring your hips up as you lean back and unfold your legs so that they are pointing up and your shins are against the pull up bar. From here, slowly lower down to the L then to the dead hang. Over time, you will be able to straighten your legs out and go directly from the L to the top position.

    in reply to: Abs 6 days out of 7? Opinions please #29518
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I think hanging leg raises and planks are generally the best exercises you can do at your level. For the time being focus on developing a full range straight legged hanging leg raise and an L sit either on the floor or parallel bars.

    No you will be fine doing planks they won’t interfere. L sits though will tax your triceps and shoulders.

    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I doubt you will get chubby switching to calisthenics. The only way you’d gain fat though is if you just don’t go as intensely and end up burning fewer calories but keep eating the same. As long as you keep the intensity up you will probably get leaner. But there’s no reason you can’t lift and do calisthenics. There’s actually a thread about that that’s been active in the last day, you should check that out.

    I have a friend who is an avid crossfitter but since training with me has added more advanced calisthenics to his training and, after training with me, sees real tangible benefits to his lifts. He sees it as a big advantage cuz most crossfitters don’t concern themselves with training for anything beyond muscle ups with huge kips.

    I’d also suggest sprinting or some other form of intense cardio if fat loss is one of your primary goals.

    in reply to: CC New Blood Routine #29513
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    It’s all good man, you don’t have to follow CC to the letter. I actually don’t care for a lot of the progressions within that particular book, and would instead point you to the progressions found in Al’s books. Also, yeah feel free to add a 3rd day. While what Coach Wade says about progressing slowly to maximize gains is valid, it’s not the only way. You can continue doing the easier stuff but you can also skip ahead to harder stuff, more workouts, etc, as long as you take care to not injure yourself. Push the limits, just don’t break them. If you feel like you’re ready, then you probably are.

    in reply to: Knee injury after doing pistol squats #29521
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I would suggest working with single leg wall sits and holding the bottom position of the pistol for time. As they are isometrics, these moves should help build joint stability for these sticking points. The key is to ensure that your knee and hip are aligned properly.

    For the wall sit, ensure that your knee is not tracking inward and that your femur more or less points forward from your hip. Try to press through your heel, you can even raise your toes and the ball of your foot off of the floor to make it more stimulating.

    For the bottom of the pistol, ensure that your hips are squared with the floor, so that you’re level and not leaning one way or the other. The free leg should be straight ahead of you.

    Work on holding those positions for time instead of doing pistols, and see how it affects your pain. This, combined with your more basic squats and lunges, should be plenty of leg work. If not, you can get more leg work by bridging. If you hold a bridge long enough, or do enough bridge push ups, your upper body will fatigue but you can actually keep going by using a sustained hip thrust combined with a leg extension to pull your body up with your lower body. In fact, this movement is the basis of the stand to stand bridge! I am hesitant to suggest something like jumping or running to you because of the pain you described with pistols.

    in reply to: L sits? #29531
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    The one thing I’d like to add to phil’s information is that, while advanced exercises can be broken down into skill and strength aspects, keep in mind that they are still intrinsic. That is, it’s not like you have the skill and then just build strength from there. As you continue to get stronger, your skill will become more and more proficient, which will manifest in further relative strength gains, which will give you more insight into the movement and thus improve your skill. That is why people who are really good at something really hard make it look easy.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 212 total)