arapahoepark

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 893 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: We’re Working Out! #30312
    J-Lewt
    Member

    Has anyone here tried the Charles Armstrong Pull-up Program? I read about it on BarStarrz and then on this guys blog: Increase your Pull-ups.

    At this point, I have been consistently doing bodyweight for six months, combining what I learned from CC 1&2 and Al’s writings (I don’t do HSPU since I am avoiding inversion exercises until I talk to my cardiologist in July).

    Is it too soon for me try this program?

    in reply to: Charles Armstrong Program #30316
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I don’t really know if you’re ready for this or not, it depends on how strong you are with pull ups now. I think if you can do sets of 5 or so reps you should be able to do it; you can always use chin ups as well.

    I’m considering doing this myself; looks like a fun little routine! Personally I’d work in some one leg squats as well, haha.

    in reply to: Charles Armstrong Program #30315
    J-Lewt
    Member

     

    RT – Thanks for the reply. Right now I alternate between doing sets of 20 assisted pull-ups for one day and then on the next workout I do sets of 4 rep pull-ups with a 2-1-2 cadence. I was planning to start in a month since I will actually have the time to do this then. If I don’t do it then, I won’t try it out until next year (that is when I have time off of work).

    Rifat – If you do not have a heart condition/vascular problem like me, practicing HSPUs is probably fine. You should always ask your doctor before you start a new workout program, but most people don’t . . .

    in reply to: Charles Armstrong Program #30314
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    For your assisted pull ups, I’d suggest focusing on negatives instead. Use the assist method to get over the bar, but then do a slow negative without assistance.

     

    Handstand push ups can be risky. If you’re concerned it wouldn’t hurt to see a doctor but most problems that people have with them are related to a shoulder issue or they get head rushes and are afraid of blacking out. If this doesn’t affect you and you don’t have a heart problem you’re probably fine, and I don’t know why a doctor would tell you it was unsafe to do them if you gave him that information, unless you had some sort of heart problem or something. But if you don’t feel like you’re seeing results then you can probably stand to tighten up your form. Make sure that your elbows are pointed somewhat inward, rather than directly outward. This is safer for the shoulders as well as more difficult all around. Eventually work on increasing the range of motion until you can bring your shoulders down to your hands at the bottom of every rep.

    If you want to build more muscle, which is what it seems like you’re getting at, you need to eat more…and make sure it’s nutritious food. I’ve read that 70% of your diet should be vegetables, and that seems reasonable to me, although I don’t eat that much haha. Round it out with lean meats (mainly chicken, turkey, salmon, some other fishes), nuts, seeds, fruits, and if you eat grains make sure it’s whole grain. check out http://www.whfoods.com for a detailed analysis of various healthy foods.

    in reply to: We’re Working Out! #30310
    scilla
    Member

    I would like to share this:

    First of all, I must say that I can currently do Pistols , but I decided to try Uneven Squats in order to improve my form and make it more solid. Not using a basketball but stable objects like stairs, gym steps, …

    At first, I wasn’t able to perform a single one by the book, but I found isometric holds in the bottom position extremely valuable, although very hard. Whenever I did these, my pistols improved in the next sessions (better form, more reps, easier reps)

    However, I got frustrated when I tried full Uneven Squats. Sometimes I managed a controlled negative, but it was impossible to go up with the resting foot on an elevation. I kept falling backwards.

    But then, I applied a tip that has been given many times with regard to pistols: to hold the foot of my resting leg in my hand. If the squatting leg was the right one, I grabbed my left foot with my left hand.

    Suddenly, Uneven squats got much easier, way easier than Pistols. A true step 7, not the pain in the ass and the more-difficult-than -the-pistol drill that has been for so some of us, CC practicioners.

    I haven’t used basketballs yet, but this morning I did 45 with each leg in half an hour, combining them with jogging. They were full ROM, controlled, ass-to-grass and with the foot of the non working leg on an elevation that was maybe two or three inches higher than a basketball

    Can this variation be considered a true Uneven Squat?. Is it cheating? Hasn’t any of you tried it?

    The point is that, on the one hand, THIS Uneven Squat is easier than a Pistol, and, on the other hand, it is much more difficult than two legged variations. Furthermore, after some sessions doing them, my Pistols get easier.

    in reply to: Charles Armstrong Program #30313
    J-Lewt
    Member

    The soreness is definitely a concern for me. While I have dealt with more pain then the average person due to having a sternotomy, six weeks of a sore back and chest (particularly with the scar tissue in my chest which some times causes muscle spasms) does could be very uncomfortable.

    I am still making progress with my current workouts, so I may save this until next year as I may have hit a plateau by then.

    in reply to: A possible tip forCC Uneven Squats (step 7)? #30311
    Rifat
    Member

    I insist you read the ‘Convict Conditioning Super F.A.Q’ book . It has detailed answer on uneven squats and also the other contradictory things like high reps , slow tempo etc.

     

    in reply to: We’re Working Out! #30296
    thebeast
    Member

    hi,

    i have a couple of questions about the grease the groove workout.
    1. can you do the GTG as your only workout routine?
    2. can you combine push ups, pull ups and dips?
    3. can i do these excercises every day?
    4. do the have to be spreaded out over the entire day or can you start at 4 pm (school out)?
    5. can you reach high reps in 1 set after using this workout for some time?(exemple: 30 pull ups, 80 push ups, 30 dips)

    in reply to: greasing the groove #30309
    Rifat
    Member

    2-4 yes.
    5- no
    1-may be

    in reply to: greasing the groove #30308
    thebeast
    Member

    what are the most consecutive reps i can reach with this routine (so max amount of reps in one set) for each excercise?

    in reply to: We’re Working Out! #30293
    Rifat
    Member

    I am trying to do the wall walking down bridges. Is it done with straight arms or bent arms?

    How wide should the hand placement be in wall assisted headstand push ups?

    in reply to: We’re Working Out! #30290

    Hi all,

    I’ve been working diligently on push ups, pull ups, leg raises, and squats for several months now, and I ‘ve been wanting to start working towards handstands and bridges. The only problem is that my wrists won’t allow me. It’s my right wrist in particular, which can’t take much weight/pressure and gets sore very easily. There seems to be a hard “lump” there–my best guess is it’s a cyst–which is causing the problem. I know that I should see a doctor to check it out, but in the meantime please humour me and answer my question. 🙂

    Push ups don’t cause my any wrist pain as I use push up bars or do knuckle push ups. So I was thinking, why not try using the push up bars when practicing handstands and bridges? Maybe some of the more advanced people here use push up bars when doing handstand push ups to get a little deeper range… But do any of you use push up bars for regular handstand and/or bridge practice? There must be somebody else out there with a weak wrist…? Somebody, anybody? 😛

    For handstands, I guess I’ll have to start with headstands first and work my way up. Doing a tripod headstand might be a bit awkward (getting my knees onto my elbows) as my elbows will be up a bit higher because of the push up bars.

    As for bridges, I’m probably a long ways away from being able to do a full back bridge, so I’ll start with trying to hold straight bridges on the push up bars.

    If any of you have any tips or comments for me about what I should do, it would be much appreciated! Thanks.

    in reply to: Wall walking bridges and headstand push ups #30295
    Al Kavadlo
    Keymaster

    For wall walks, try to keep your arms as straight as you can, though some bending is virtually unavoidable.

    For HSPUS the hands should a little wider than shoulder-width. Over time you can adopt a narrower position, which will decrease your leverage and make the exercise more difficult.

    in reply to: Handstands and bridges with push up bars #30292
    Al Kavadlo
    Keymaster

    You shouldn’t have any major issues using the bars for straight bridges. Though like you said, doing a headstand might pose a challenge.

    Just start experimenting for yourself and see what you can do. The best knowledge is self knowledge!

    in reply to: greasing the groove #30307
    thebeast
    Member

    i’m now doing 2 one arm push ups against a table each set (aprox 15 sets a day) and 3-4 explosive pull ups and slowly down (also 15 sets a day). i’ll do it 2 days and then one day rest. will this improve my one arm push ups, push ups and pull ups?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 893 total)