Trainingfor running and squats

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  • #29790
    bearaab
    Member

    I’ve recently signed up to run a half marathon as its something I’ve always wanted to do. I’ve also been working on my squats and close squats for some time, never really feel comfortable or strong enough to progress on to any of the pistol progressions. Now I know that long distance running is endurance training and pistols are at the complete other end of the scale for me right now, but will 3 months of running training hinder my progress of squats? I’m also carrying a stone and a half I would like to get rid of (1 stone down already) and I’m hoping continuing with eating the right foods and a bit of running will bring that down and in the long run make squatting easier.

    #29801
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Yeah, it could hinder your progress on pistols. But keep in mind that pistols have a very large skill and mobility component (aside from the strength necessary). My favorite progressions for the pistol are to use a wall or doorframe to assist yourself with your hands, doing single leg wall sits, and holding the bottom position of the pistol for time. You should be able to work on these. You should also work on your stretching, as you need reasonable hip mobility and hamstring flexibility to do pistols, and this should be beneficial for your half marathon training as well.

    #29800
    bearaab
    Member

    Thanks for the advice. I do work on my stretching but definitely not committed enough. I’ll have to give the wall sits and holding the bottom position a go. I find that when I use a pole to assist me I use my arms quite a bit and I don’t think I’m quite at that level. I’ll probably keep on working on the standard squats and the close squats while I’m increasing my flexibility as well as that is definitely needed.

    #29799
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Well spotting yourself with a pole is mostly about familiarizing yourself with the movement. It doesn’t really matter how much you use your arms in this one, because the rebalancing is what’s diminishing the difficulty of the movement, not the actual strength of pulling from your upper body. Try spotting yourself with just one finger, and you will likely find that it still makes it much easier, even if you don’t feel like your finger is pulling very hard.

    To work the strength for pistols you would do the wall sits or elevated pistols. I prefer wall sits though because they’re different enough from full pistols that they are more worthwhile later on when you do get the pistols.

    #29798
    bearaab
    Member

    Thanks. I’ll give the wall sits a go I think.

    #29797
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    I’d also suggest holding the bottom position for time. I can’t overstate how important it is to be comfortable in that position. I’ve done full pistols with nearly 50% of my bodyweight in additional weight, and I still think that the combination of those two isometric exercises are among, if not, the best exercises to familiarize yourself with the pistol. Not only do they provide time under tension, but more time at the most difficult points of a movement is crucial in allowing your nervous system to adapt to the muscular activation necessary for the positions. The one leg wall sit gives you strength to press up, but also teaches you hip and leg alignment and core activation necessary to keep your form through the sticking point of the movement. Holding the bottom gives you the mobility in the hips, hamstrings, and ankles to maintain the position, but it also engages your hamstrings and calves in pulling your weight forward and your hip flexors and quads in holding the free leg up and straight out. So you see, this time gives you the opportunity to focus more on the strictness of your form while your neuvous system adapts.

    #29796
    bearaab
    Member

    That sounds like exactly what I need what with my flexibility issues. Thanks a lot for your help, I’ll let you know how I get on.

    #29795
    Al Kavadlo
    Keymaster

    A lot of people don’t know this, but I’ve done a lot of running over the years in addition to all my strength work. I’ve completed dozens of races including 3 Half Marathons, a full Marathon and an Oylmpic distance Triathlon. Running is good for your legs!

    #29794
    bearaab
    Member

    I’ve also found that now I’m running I’m stretching more often. I think I have seriously underestimated the importance of stretching up till now. My hips feel more loose, I can nearly touch the floor without bending my legs with the whole palm of my hand and I can nearly touch my hands together behind my back. Feel so much better after a workout now I’m taking 10-15 minutes to stretch all over.

    #29793
    bearaab
    Member

    I’ve been running for a week and a half now and I’ve added the wall squats into my work outs a couple of times as well as working on my close stance squats and regular stretching. It’s absolutely amazing how much my pistol depth has increased already compared to what it was before. It seems I’ve also underestimated isometric training as well. Thanks a lot for your advice. Hopefully I can tell you about my first full pistol squat in the future.

    #29792
    Sisko1980
    Member

    I also run, mostly 10 km, but I also ran a half marathon once. I ran before I started training calisthenics and I have to say I have the feeling that the training helped a lot for running. I feel so much stronger now and have more fun running, my joints feel strong. And I can also do pistols now, 2-3 at the moment, but getting stronger everytime. In short I think calisthenics is amazing for running.

    #29791
    bearaab
    Member

    Ran my first 10km yesterday morning. Legs felt like jelly after and I didn’t get a chance to do my stretching session at lunch due to a LONG day at work. Feel horrendous this morning.

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