Question for Robby Taylor

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  • #29782
    Mohammed
    Member

    Hi, Robby,

    Last time you mentioned in a post that while you like Convict Conditioning, you do not think that some of the exercises are entirely practical. Can you please elaborate? For each progression, which exercises would you remove and what would you recommend instead? What else might you change about CC?

    Since I’m following CC, I’d find your insight really helpful. Thank you!

    P.S., hope it’s ok to make two threads. Thought it better to split my queries

    #29789
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Honestly I don’t have access to CC right now, but say the stand to stand bridges. The wall walks I find more work the shoulders than train your body to properly do the stand to stand bridge. The only thing I really did for it was the one arm/opposite leg bridge. The stand to stand bridge is all about the posterior chain and lower body development and activation in the bridge, the shoulder strength required is minimal. For the one arm pull up, I find the best progressions are negatives and isometrics (one arm flex hangs), neither of which are mentioned in CC. It’s mostly a general approach to the methodology of the progressions. Like, he used a basketball for lots of progressions, but I’ve never done that, and I recall finding every variation in the book with the basketball seemed less practical than a given alternative.

    #29788
    Sisko1980
    Member

    Hi, since I also follow CC, I thought I could add a question. I am currently on my way to the Master Steps, very close for some and I changed the progressions for nearly every exercise a little bit, apart from Leg Raises maybe. So since you seem to know some things about bridges: I currently do what is called in CC Full Bridges, I guess standard bridges. Next step would be down the wall bridges. Since you dont seem to be a fan of that, what would you advice to get to Stand to Stand bridges? Thanx in advance.

    #29787
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Well like I said all I did was bridges with one arm and the opposite leg. Get comfortable with that, use the pinky of your free hand against the floor or a wall to spot the balance if you need to. Build up to at least 30 seconds per side. By the time I could do that without much trouble, I could do the stand to stand bridge.

    You can also do bridge push ups, but you must do them in a specific way. You need to rely primarily on strength from your lower body, core, and posterior chain to propel your body upwards. First, Drive your knees forward, squeeze your glutes and hamstrings trying to keep your hips above your ankles. This will allow you to pull the weight of your upper body forward and keep it centered for the lift. Second, imagine there is a rope tied around your waist and someone in front of you is pulling you up by it. This represents how you need to activate your core, by pulling your upper body forward and up from the hips. Third, flex your quads in an attempt to straighten your knees. This is how you will actually stand up. It is a combination of these three forces that will allow you to do the stand to stand bridge. By being mindful of them in doing bridge push ups, it should help you train for stand to stand bridges. I also recommend touching the back of your shoulders to the ground for each rep, as this will give you a full ROM in your arms.

    Lastly, you can try doing stand to stand bridges onto elevated surfaces, trying to go lower over time.

    #29786
    Mohammed
    Member

    Thanks for your response, Robby. Hopefully when I’m further along in CC, I’ll get back to you for replacement exercises on other progressions!

    #29785
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Trust me, you will know. If you start to feel pangs of tendinitis then you know youre starting to push too hard. Heed this warning or you could more seriously injure yourself and set your training back by weeks or longer.

    But I don’t think its as cut and dry as “tendons need 2x as long as muscles”. If you’re not sure, the safest thing to do is not do anything too extreme for you. If you’re worried, I’d say if you can’t do at least 5 or 6 reps in a single set (fully rested), then don’t do it in a workout. If you push it hard you have to be very comfortable and confident with your body’s abilities and movements so you can recognize the line between pushing hard and injuring yourself.

    #29784
    MichaelP
    Member

    Also, when it is spoken of that tendon and joint strength take longer to adapt than muscles, is it still referring to muscle directly related to those tendons and joints, or some other bodily flesh altogether that has to adapt?

    #29783
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    For cardio, the quickest and easiest things to do would be jumping jacks, jump rope, burpees, or jump squats. Sprints are good too except they take more time and are very hard on your body, so are only appropriate for advanced trainees. I’m not a huge fan of elliptical machines. Swimming is great, but I always found it a rather substantial investment of time as an exercise. Kind of like sprinting or, even worse, jogging, in the time commitment sense.

    Generally, when comparing muscles and connective tissue, you’d be comparing those that are directly connected.

     

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