Progression Advice

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  • #30069
    burtchellr
    Member

    So I’m currently working on basic skills(Hollow body, hollow body rocks, arches and arch rocks) to prepare my core for front/back levers, and other various movements. I’d like to build my program around a lever progression, planch progression on one day, but curious as to in terms of skill development, which lever, front or back, would be more beneficial to learn first?

    Looking at the transfer of of skill, I feel like the back lever would help my planche training out, but would stress my posterior chain more, and therefore I’d lack anterior chain strength with just planche and L-sit progressions( yes I’m working on that too). Any advice?

    #30076
    burtchellr
    Member

    Awesome, thank you for the feedback. As for the L-sits and bridging, I practice them 2-3x a week on my leg day(shrimp squats/pistols).

    When it comes to bent arm skills I alternate volume with my straight arm skills.

    For example, I’ll do higher Time under tension on my straight arm skills Monday and lower total reps on my bent arm skills.

    On Thursday, I’ll work less times under tension(1/2-3/4 volume of Monday) and more total reps on my bent arm strength.

    #30075
    Al Kavadlo
    Keymaster

    As usual, Robby’s advice is spot on! Keep training hard, burtchellr!

    #30074
    burtchellr
    Member

    Thanks Al!

    Another question.
    Lately I’ve been seeing a minimalist approach to training coming up more and more. Currently I’m training 5-6 times a week, 4x a week for skills/strength and 2x for conditioning. In regards to skill training and learning new skills I understand low volume, constant stimulation is considered best, but what would be your opinion’s on this?

    #30073
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Well, any significantly difficult skill is going to take months to get no matter what. At first you may not be able to work the skill that much. With the back lever, one would typically be limited by pangs of tendonitis in the elbows. As you get stronger and more familiar with the skill you can work it more. Half of it is your muscles, joints and tendons developing conditioning and the other half is your CNS getting more efficient at the movement pattern.

    #30072
    burtchellr
    Member

    Awesome, thank you Robby. I know about 2 months ago I progressed from tucked back lever to the extended tuck, but I had to back off because I tried to keep the same mon/tues/thurs/fri schedule.
    Like a complete impatient idiot, I went from 4x a week 2-4 sets for 8-15sec holds with the tucked back lever, to attempting the same volume with a higher intensity…

    #30071
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    How long can you hold a tuck back lever? I think you should spend time doing longer holds with the tuck back lever and german hang/skin the cat because at this stage you need to primarily get really used to the shoulder mechanics of the exercise. While the flat tuck back lever is a bit harder, you will find it easier to progress further by getting more comfortable with the position, thus allowing you to more effectively utilize the strength you already have. Your strength will steadily improve as well.

    #30070
    burtchellr
    Member

    Thanks Robby for the feedback. I was at the point where I could hold the tucked back lever for 4 sets of 15sec. I never did a max out. I just took the advice from sommer’s building the gymnastic body, and increased progression once I hit multiple sets of 15 sec. I did the same thing with my straight arm frog planch. I hit 4×15, and jumped right into the tucked, which I help for 6sec max. I never did German hangs, mainly because I didn’t know about them.

    So, after I hurt my biceps and elbows, I moved back to working planch leans, flexed holds, hollow body holds, and inverted hangs.

    The planche and front/back lever are my primary skills focus for the time being, but I’m also throwing in pull ups, PPP, handstand holds, dips, headstand push-ups, l-sits, bridges, and elbow lever reverse leg lifts to work on core/ pressing strength to help out with static strength. I’ve alternate verticle and horizontal pressing/pulling strength exercises monthly.

    Example: Monday/Thursday lever/planch work, horizontal pressing/pulling/legs
    Tues/frid lever/planche work, verticle pressing/pulling/legs.

    All my sessions are roughly 20-45min Low volume, but high intensity. Every fourth week I deload by cutting sets in half, switch up to 3 days, or just work statics mon/thurs, press/pull/legs tues/frid

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