Fatigue and Sluggishness

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  • #29693
    DarrenChia
    Member

    I do exercises like Push-Ups and Pull-Ups 6 days a week. Currently for Push-ups, I do 6-7 reps of Self-Assisted One-Arm Push-Ups for each side in every session. I do 4 reps of Chin-Ups, Pull-Ups and Neutral Grips for these sessions. I usually do a Heavy leg workout at the end of week. It all started at the beginning of September when I used to do 10 Clap Push-Ups already only for warm-up. I did these for a week before I felt sluggish and stopped and resumed the 10 Push-Up warm-up. The fatigue did not go away and I suffered it daily. I lost the drive and motivation to workout. I used to feel so excited and happy just to do the workout sessions, but not anymore…. I feel tired and feel like lying down all day…. please help me…..

    #29697
    gettingon
    Member

    I’m pretty sure your day consists of a bit more than doing pushups and pullups. Like maybe you eat stuff? And that stuff can play a pretty big part in fatigue and recovery. What are your sleep/rest/stress levels like. You’ve given like no info with which to help…

    #29696
    gettingon
    Member

    Sounds like you need more sleep – if you are waking up tired then something is obviously off. Have you experimented with naps? And you might want to educate yourself as far as nutrition, understand the impact of high glycemic foods on mood and energy levels and so on (your diet looks high in refined carb).

    #29695
    DarrenChia
    Member

    Thanks for your advice. I will work on the loops and holes you spotted. By the way, does cortisol cause similar things like the one that is happening to me?

    #29694
    gettingon
    Member

    Hey dude, yes cortisol plays a part. So does insulin. So does serotonin. So do a lot of other hormones and neurotransmitters that aren’t even part of popular health science. I don’t think it’s so helpful to point at hormones (unless there is a glandular issue obviously). They are part of your body’s response and adaptation to whatever it is you’re putting your body through. It might not even be something you are conscious of. We often think we’re doing the right things but unfortunately society makes it easy for us to go wrong, like eat foods that are bad and follow other unhealthy pursuits that are completely socially acceptable.

    If you eat a lot dairy you might want to try reducing that, some people have issues even though they appear lactose tolerant. Same with gluten. This is why I advised you should educate yourself, though in saying I must acknowledge that a lot of the information you’ll find is confusing and contradictory. Ultimately experimenting is the only way to be sure. Have you ever tried an elimination diet? Look into something called Whole30 if you haven’t, it can be very enlightening. At any rate, try and avoid nutritional dogma, it’s even more cumbersome than exercise dogma because when it comes to metabolism and digestion there can be more variation between people – just because someone else eats something and apparently gets the results you want doesn’t mean it will work for you.

    But again, the importance of good sleep cannot be dismissed.

    btw I was looking at your training volume, looks like you’ve got a lot of sets. If there are more than 5 reps per set you may be overdoing it (if your focus is strength and not hypertrophy). More doesn’t mean better, in fitness more is often just more. Great if you’re into endurance, not needed for much else 😉 Train smarter not harder!

     

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