Correcting Hanging Knee Raises

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  • #29953
    jasonlparks
    Member

    Hello All,Today I progressed to hanging knee raises. Last week when I did leg raises & completed the progression, my abs were on fire and sore from the work. This time however, I felt like my abs weren’t working as hard & after a mental playback, it felt like I doing more of a leg lifting exercise instead of an ab exercise. What steps can I take to fix this issue and really focus on improving my waist? Thanks in advance for all the advice.

    #29957
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Visualize this exercise as a sort of “upside down” crunch, as far as the rectus abdominis is concerned. Imagine a rope connecting from your sternum to your pelvis, and there are little guys up there pulling your legs up. This is essentially what you should be doing, you just have to know how to approach it mentally, as with any exercise. Otherwise you are likely using your hips more; think of this more like the opposite of a squat, as far as the hips are concerned. That’s what it sounds to me like you were doing.

    #29956
    jasonlparks
    Member

    That’s exactly what I think I’m doing (opposite squat type motion). My abs felt engaged from me drawing my stomach in but not from the leg raises. Essentially, you’re saying the leg raising is just a by product of the motion?

    #29955
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Essentially, yes. The key is intent. A lot of people simply do an exercise in any way they can, or whichever way they happen to do it (I would say “naturally”, but many people in modern societies have poor movement patterns due to leading unnatural physical lifestyles [sitting down with poor posture for hours, rounding their backs when they bend down to pick something up, etc]). But in doing so they could be (and often are) missing out on some of the benefits of the exercise.

    The reason I gave the idea of little men at the bottom of your sternum pulling your legs up with a rope that’s connected to your pelvis is because it’s an easy way to pretty accurately visualize the control of the contraction of the rectus abdominis.

    #29954
    Robby Taylor
    Member

    Essentially, yes. The key is intent. A lot of people simply do an exercise in any way they can, or whichever way they happen to do it (I would say “naturally”, but many people in modern societies have poor movement patterns due to leading unnatural physical lifestyles [sitting down with poor posture for hours, rounding their backs when they bend down to pick something up, etc]). But in doing so they could be (and often are) missing out on some of the benefits of the exercise.

    The reason I gave the idea of little men at the bottom of your sternum pulling your legs up with a rope that’s connected to your pelvis is because it’s an easy way to pretty accurately visualize the control of the contraction of the rectus abdominis.

    You may also want to try to rotate your hips more in the movement as well. Try to think of pointing at something in front of you with your tailbone…which in turn would be controlled by the little men at the bottom of your sternum.

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